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Los Angeles, CA 90019

 

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PAINTING 101

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HOW TO PAINT A ROOM

Painting a room can seem like a daunting task but it's totally worth all

the work in the end. For me, seeing the steps all laid out helps make a

task seem less overwhelming. And so I bring you a step-by-step guide

for painting a room:

 

What You Need

Materials

Paint of your choosing

Painters tape

Paint roller and refill brush

Paint brushes for detail and touch up

Paint tray

Drop cloth (optional)

Rags for clean-up and oopses

Tools

Ladder

Flat head screwdriver

 

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    Instructions:

     

    Before you start painting, make sure you have plenty of fresh air in the room. Open windows and, if necessary, have a fan blowing out of the room.

     

    1. Move furniture out of the room to be painted. For large furniture that cannot be removed, move to the center of the room and cover with a drop cloth.

    ​​2. Wash/vacuum the walls to be painted. It may seem like an unnecessary step but you'd be surprised how much dirt/pet hair/dust hangs out on the walls of your home.

     

    3. Fill holes in the walls from nails and screws with a patching compound.

     

    4. While the patching compound dries, apply painters tape to protect trim (and anything else you don't want painted). Taping may seem like a pain in the neck but it's totally worth it. There are also edging tools that claim to eliminate the need to tape but I haven't had much luck with them.

     

    5. After the patching compound has dried, smooth over with fine sandpaper. Remove excess dust by vacuuming and wiping the patched area with a damp cloth.

     

    6. Remove outlet and switch plates.

     

    7. And now, after all that prep work, you finally get to paint! Pour a generous portion of paint into the tray, place a new roller refill on your roller, and get to work!

     

    9. After all the walls are covered, go back with a paint brush and touch up in corners and other hard-to-reach areas you couldn't get with the roller.

     

    10. Despite the fact that many paints promise one-coat coverage, I've never been able to achieve it. While waiting for the paint to dry between coats, store your paint tray, roller, and brushes in plastic bags. This will keep the paint from drying on your tools.

     

    11. Apply second coat of paint.

     

    12. After all paint has dried, carefully remove tape. Use a small detail brush to touch up any areas around the tape that may need it. If paint has collected in the nooks and crannies of your taping, use an Xacto knife to cut the tape and lift edges from the walls.

     

    13. Reinstall the outlet and switch plates, move your furniture back into the room, and start accessorizing with your new paint color!

All About Paint

Water-Based Paint: (Latex paint is often called water-based) Commonly used on walls and ceilings, it is less toxic and easier to clean up than oil-based paints. Water-based paint comes in a variety of sheens including matte, eggshell or high-gloss. Water-based paint works well on surfaces previously painted with latex or flat oil-base paints. It usually doesn’t adhere well to high-gloss finishes, however, and cannot be used on bare steel because it will rust it. Water-based paint can be used on top of wallpaper, but there is a risk that the water in the paint may cause the paper to peel away from the wall.

 

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    Latex Paint: Often called "acrylic latex" because it contains a plastic resin made of acrylics or polyvinyls to help it adhere better (see Water-Based Paint).

     

    Oil-Based Paint: Commonly used on molding, cabinets and furniture. It provides a protective coating and creates a smoother finish than water-based paint.

     

    To tell whether your current wall color is water- or oil-based, douse a white cloth with rubbing alcohol and rub it on the wall (in an out-of-the-way spot). If the paint softens and begins to transfer onto the cloth, it is water based. If the alcohol does not remove any color, it is oil-based.

     

    Primer: Used to seal bare surfaces and provide a base for paint to grab on to. If you've spackled your walls, priming is a must to prevent the spackle from bleeding through the paint. Use water-based primer on new drywall, previously painted walls (including those that have been patched, repaired or stained), galvanized metal and nonferrous metals. Use oil-based primer on severely stained or damaged walls, on paneling, under wallpaper, and on wrought iron, ferrous metal and raw wood.

     

     

    Sheen: A paint's sheen gives it a certain finish and quality. There are several options:

     

    Matte/Flat: Smooth finish, has little or no sheen. Helps hide surface imperfections but may suffer damage more easily than other finishes. Best for low-traffic areas.

     

    Eggshell: Velvety sheen, easy to clean. Great middle-of-the-road option between flat and high gloss. Gives a flatter look than glossy paint but still provides hard-wearing and protective coating.

     

    Satin: Silky, pearl-like finish, stain-resistant. Creates protective shell that resists moisture and mildew. Good for kitchens, bathrooms and high-traffic areas.

     

    Semigloss: Sleek, radiant and high resistance to moisture. Good for cabinets, doors and windows.

     

    High Gloss: Very durable and easy to clean. Its glass-like finish makes it good for trim and molding.

     

    Water-Based Paint: (Latex paint is often called water-based) Commonly used on walls and ceilings, it is less toxic and easier to clean up than oil-based paints. Water-based paint comes in a variety of sheens including matte, eggshell or high-gloss. Water-based paint works well on surfaces previously painted with latex or flat oil-base paints. It usually doesn’t adhere well to high-gloss finishes, however, and cannot be used on bare steel because it will rust it. Water-based paint can be used on top of wallpaper, but there is a risk that the water in the paint may cause the paper to peel away from the wall.

All About Color

Hue: Another term for specific points on the pure, clear range of the color wheel. under wallpaper, and on wrought iron, ferrous metal and raw wood.

 

​Primary Colors: Red, blue and yellow. All other colors are derived from these three.

 

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    Monochromatic: Color schemes that are shades and tints of one color. For example: brown and taupe or shades of blue.

     

    Secondary Colors: A mix of two primary colors. For example: violet is made from mixing blue and red, green is made from yellow and blue, and yellow and red combine to make orange

     

    Triad Colors: Three colors that are equally spaced on the color wheel, such as red, yellow and blue or green, orange and violet.

     

    Value/Tone: Degree of lightness or darkness of a color. It is determined by adding black to create a shade, white to create a tint, or gray to create a tone. Monochromatic color schemes are shades and tints of one color.

     

    ​​Color Wheel: A pie-shaped diagram showing the range and relationship of colors.

     

    Complementary Colors: Hues directly opposite each other on the color wheel. For example: green paired with red or orange paired with blue, like this pale blue dining room accompanied by bold orange accents. As the strongest contrasts, complements tend to intensify each other.

     

    Harmonious (Analogous) Colors: Three to six colors close together on the color wheel. The shared underlying color generally gives such color schemes a coherent, sophisticated look. Since little variety of color is used, interest has to come from texture, pattern, lighting and accessorizing. This eclectic living room draws in analogous hues of yellow, orange and hints of red to add interest to the space.

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